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Graduate Fellows

Danielle Allor

allor headshot 757d6This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. is a PhD Candidate in the English department at Rutgers University. Her work focuses on vegetal life and late medieval literature, arguing that late medieval authors imported knowledge-organizing and classifying strategies from natural philosophy to bolster claims to religious authenticity and literary authority. Her dissertation, “Trees of Thought: Arboreal Matter and Metaphor in Late Medieval England,” examines trees as material and figural classification systems in the work of William Langland, Geoffrey Chaucer, John Lydgate, and John Skelton.

Virginia Conn

conn headshot CCAThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. is a PhD candidate in the Comparative Literature program at Rutgers University, whose work occurs at the intersection of comparative languages and literatures (Sinophone, Anglophone, Francophone, Germanophone, and Russophone literatures) and science and technology studies, particularly those aspects of STS that investigate circulations of knowledge and biopolitics. Her research interests include the intersection of science fiction and ideology, socialist teleologies, the ethics of progress, and nationalist technologies of embodiment. Her dissertation examines socialist modernities by questioning how science fiction conscientiously harnessed utopian ideals of technological advancement as rational blueprints to shape the country’s citizens. Virginia has published peer-reviewed articles in science fiction studies, cultural studies, visual studies, and computer science journals. In addition to her academic research, she works for the international division of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

Aghil Daghagheleh

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Sociology at Rutgers University. He is currently a graduate fellow at the Center for Cultural Analysis at Rutgers University (CCA) and recently finished a project on social movements and electoral politics in Iran. In his current research project, Refusal: Resistance, Subjectivity, and Construction of Arabness in Iran, Aghil explores the geography of social marginalization in contemporary Iran, a topic which brings together research on the politics of marginalized communities, social movements, race and ethnic relations, nationalism, political economy, religion, and resistance. Through an ethnographic study of the everyday experiences and politics of Arab minority, Aghil shows how ethnicity becomes a significant facet of subaltern politics and explores modalities of resistance, subversion, negotiation, and refusal that marginalized communities deploy to cope with the effects of ethnoreligious nationalism and to unsettle ethnicity, nationhood, and citizenship, as major products of state classification. He problematizes the notions of citizenship and belonging in the Islamic Republic by highlighting the work of classification in perpetuating structures of power and forms of everyday domination and resistance. Aghil is also participating in a comparative research project, The Rise of The Peripheral, that explores the conflicts about the extraction of natural resources that are increasingly expressed in indigenous, ethnic, racial, and decolonial terms. He works with Dr. Zakia Salime (Rutgers) to examines the collective and individual forms of resistance at the nexus of neoliberal economics and political authoritarianism in the United States, Morocco, and Iran.

Alex Leslie

leslie headshot CCAThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. is a PhD candidate in the English Department at Rutgers University. His research primarily focuses on the intersection of print circulation and cultural geography in the long nineteenth century. His dissertation “Reading Regionally: Cultural Geography and American Literature, 1865-1915” argues that region was not simply a framework for representing cultural difference but a structuring principle of the postbellum cultural field: it explores how literary texts were read differently in different regions of the country and how this fact shaped editorial policy and authorial production. Alex is also currently the Rutgers Libraries Graduate Digital Humanities Specialist.

 

Irina Nicorici

IMG 20180814 094615 31240This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. is an advanced PhD student in Sociology at Rutgers. Her dissertation focuses on the Soviet migration policies and the bureaucratic processing of applications for entry into or exit from the USSR. Empirically, she investigates how the Soviet Union and its heirs collected data about their inhabitants and visitors between 1960 and 2000, how the state machineries accounted for and controlled who belonged, and how the publics responded to such evaluative metrics. In addition to the sociology of citizenship, she is also interested in the gendered logics of stratification, migration control, state organization and economic governance, as well as race and ethnic relations. 

 

Mónica Hernández Ospina

hernandez headshot CCAThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. is a doctoral candidate in the Geography Department at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Her research interests have been focused on the formation of territories and contested spaces in contexts of conflict over land ownership, as it traditionally occurs in Colombia. In her current research, she analyzes collective land property conflicts and how collective titling processes are used by state governments as instruments to protect ethnic communities. Using fieldwork and archival research, she studies processes through which Afro Colombians obtained collective titles of ownership for the territories they have occupied traditionally. Working on different scales, her goal is to examine the tensions between state and rural/ethnic communities, using land property as a relationship where those tensions are constantly deployed. 

 

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