Fellows

Mark Aaukhus

headshot of Mark AakhusThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. investigates the relationship between communication and design, especially the uses of technological and organizational design, to augment human interaction and reasoning for decision-making and conflict-management. He uses multiple methods from discourse analysis and computational social science to examine language, argumentation, and social interaction in professional practice, organizational processes, and information infrastructures. The aim in these streams of research is to improve understanding of the intentional, and emergent, design of institutions for communication and the consequences for the co-creation of health, wellness, and democracy.

Tobias Schulze-Cleven

headshot of Tobias Schulze-ClevenThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. is Associate Professor of Labor Studies and Employment Relations at the Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations (SMLR), and the Director of SMLR’s Center for Global Work and Employment. Interested in the role of collective action for sustaining social protection and economic performance, he studies the contemporary politics of labor market and higher education reforms in the rich democracies. A recipient of the John T. Dunlop award for research of international significance (Labor and Employment Relations Association, 2018), Tobias held fellowships at Harvard University and from Germany’s Max Planck Society, and received a teaching award at UC Berkeley. While at CCA, he examines the effects of shifting state strategies and faculty mobilization on the academy in transatlantic comparison.

Nichole Margarita Garcia

headshot of Nichole GarciaThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. is an Assistant Professor of Higher Education in the Graduate School of Education at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. As a Chicana/Puerto Rican her research focuses on the intersections race, feminism, and Latinx/a/o communities in higher education She is a recipient of the Andrew W. Mellon dissertation fellowship which she completed a comparative study on Chicana/o and Puerto Rican college-educated families to advance narratives of intergenerational achievement and college choice processes.Dr. Garcia has published in international and national journals such as Race, Ethnicity and EducationThe Journal of Latinos in EducationJournal of Hispanics in Higher EducationInternational Journal of Qualitative Studies in Educationand Frontiers.She is a regular contributor to Diverse Issues in Higher Education Magazine, The Latino Book Review,and Motivos: Bilingual Magazine. She received her PhD in Social Science and Comparative Education with a specialization in Race and Ethnic Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Kristin O’Brassill-Kulfan

KOK 2018 Christopher Kulfan CopyThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. is an Instructor in the History Department at Rutgers University, where she directs the Public History Program. She holds a PhD in History from the University of Leicester and an MA in Modern History from Queens University Belfast, and researches poverty, labor, mobility, crime and punishment in the early American northeast, as well as public historical and commemorative representations of these subjects. Kristin is the author of Vagrants and Vagabonds: Poverty and Mobility in the Early American Republic (New York University Press, 2019) and several chapters, articles, and essays on early American and public history. She has previously worked as an archivist and research analyst for the Pennsylvania House of Representatives Archives, and in museums, archives, and libraries in the US and the UK curating exhibits, managing archival collections, and creating inclusive public programming. She regularly consults on public history projects in New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania, and edits the new Routledge series Global Perspectives on Public History. 

Karen M O'Neill

Karen O'Neill headshotThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. is a sociologist studying coastal climate adaptation, biodiversity, and other policies on land and water. This includes understanding who wins and who loses under different policies. Karen has written or co-edited books on the U.S. program for river flood control and the growth of government power (Rivers by Design, Duke University Press), on race and Hurricane Katrina (Katrina’s Imprint, Rutgers University Press), and the book Taking Chances, on changes in institutions in response to Hurricane Sandy (Rutgers University Press).

Jessica Mack

Jessica Mack headshotThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. is a historian of Latin America whose research explores urban transformation, intellectual life and the public sphere in twentieth-century Mexico. Her current book project traces the spatial reconfiguration of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) on its midcentury campus in Mexico City. By chronicling the planning and construction of this University City, the project explains the national university’s shifting role in Mexico’s developing revolutionary state and examines the ways in which national priorities were inscribed upon intellectual and cultural life. Reshaping the space of the university both reconfigured Mexico City’s urban landscape and realigned consent and contestation in national politics. She explores the role of the university more broadly through work in the digital humanities, university archives and public history and is a contributor to the Princeton & Slavery digital history project. She holds a B.A. in History from Wesleyan University and a Ph.D. in History from Princeton University.

Shari M. Cunningham

headshot of Shari CunninghamThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., M.S., is a Ph.D. candidate in the Higher Education program in the School of Graduate Studies and a proud Educational Opportunity Fund alumna. She earned a Bachelors in American Studies with a double minor in History and Political Science and a Master of Science in Business from the College of Saint Elizabeth. 

She was an assistant director in the Office of Financial Aid for the Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences (RBHS) programs at the Piscataway campus.

Currently Ms. Cunningham serves as a student representative for the Advisory Council for the Graduate School of Education and the co-Vice President for the Graduate School of Education Student Affairs Committee. Her research interest primarily focuses on how Black students make sense of their scholarly journey throughout the stages of doctoral study. Her prior research projects included historical archival research on the emergence of Colored school in 19th century Newark as well as being a contributing author on two chapters to Scarlet and Black: Vol. 2, a Rutgers University exploration of its historical past as a mechanism for reconciliation. 

Nora Devlin

Nora Devlin headshotThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. is an advanced doctoral student in the PhD in Higher Education program at Rutgers Graduate School of Education. Nora's research interests deal with justice and organizational/governance structures in universities, specifically in the realm of higher education law. Her dissertation examines faculty First Amendment cases brought against their (public) university employers. Nora researches the current caselaw on faculty free speech cases which reflects a split among the federal circuits, only some of which recognize the free speech rights of public university faculty. Her research seeks to map and theorize this landscape while offering practical recommendations for faculty, faculty organizers, and university leaders.

Benjamin Foley

Benjamin Foley headshotThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. is a doctoral candidate in sociology at Rutgers University and an activist interested in how white organizers understand and navigate "whiteness" as they participate in interracial coalitions and politics. His dissertation is a historical sociological study of the Young Patriots Organization—a group of poor white migrants from Appalachia who formed in the impoverished neighborhood of “Uptown” Chicago in 1968. Paradoxically brandishing Confederate flags and Black Panther pins, they protested racism against “hillbillies” and “oppressed white people,” and claimed solidarity with other oppressed people of color around the world. Remarkably, the Illinois Black Panther Party saw the Patriots as an ally and recruited them to join their Rainbow Coalition in 1969. The Patriots’ heterodox “white revolutionary” discourse, Ben contends, complicates how we think about “whiteness” and how white anti-racism should and could happen. Rather than treating “whiteness” as an attitude or idea to be rejected, and inadvertently reaffirming its legitimacy as race category, the Patriots “produce” a race discourse where the essentialism of white/ nonwhite binary discourse is weakened, and thereby drained of some of its normative power. Through organizing free medical clinics, food pantries, and other “serve the people” programs, the Patriots link poor southern whites’ poverty and oppression to structural anti-“hillbilly” racism in Chicago. In doing so, the Patriots sought solidarity with other oppressed people of color, not out of a moral or pragmatic objection to “whiteness,” but out of a sense of shared positionally as racially oppressed by white supremacy. While the Patriots’ race discourse often erroneously (and dangerously) equates intra-white racism to racism against communities of color, it merits attention because it offers a model of antiracism that chips away at how white supremacy is reproduced in white ideology. In my project for CCA, therefore, I explore how the Patriots’ experience with Students for a Democratic Society organizers formulated this extraordinary race consciousness.

Scott Harris

head shot of Scott HarrisThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. is a Ph.D. candidate in English at Rutgers University. His research and teaching focus on twentieth- and twenty-first-century British literature and culture. His dissertation, “English Variety: Popular Theatrical Culture and Localist Form in the Post-Consensus Novel,” analyzes the sociopolitical function of popular theatrical forms as they appear in the work of Salman Rushdie, Angela Carter, Sarah Waters, and Ian McEwan. It suggests that contemporary fiction, marked by the decline of imperialism and post-war social consensus, takes up the popular theater in order to provide alternatives to cosmopolitan and democratic forms of inclusion in an age characterized by sociopolitical division.